A Communal Confession

by Sara Zebovitz

One of the most repeated prayers in the Rosh haShana and Yom Kippur services – and the ten days in between – is one of repentance. It’s called the Ashamnu (literally, “we have been guilty”), the prayer of confession. It is written as an acrostic, a type of poem common in Jewish prayer. The Ashamnu is said silently during the Amidah prayer, and aloud afterwards. The unique thing about this prayer is that it is not a personal repentance; all of the words are in the first person, plural, and past tense. We say, “אשמנו, בגדנו, גזלנו…” – “we have incurred guilt, we have betrayed, we have stolen…” Why is this prayer recited in this tense, and why are we required to atone for things we have not done? We may have not stolen, lied, committed adultery, or acted violently, but there are others in our communities who have. By reciting this prayer of collective confession, we are taking responsibility over our wider community and taking it upon ourselves to repent for those who have not.

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Welcome Our New Shlichim!

Picture of Ido Rumianek

Ido, 34, comes to us from Pardes Hana. He is married to Nurit and father to Alma, a 1 year-old baby. He grew up in Kfar Kish (in the north of Israel), where he was a chanich and a madrich in the B'nei-haMoshavim youth movement (a division within our sister movement of haNoar haOved v'haLomed). He is a social worker with experience with youth at risk and adolescence groups in Israel.

 

Hila Huber, Camp Galil

Hila Huber, Camp Galil

Hila, 23, was raised in Gan Ner, near Mt. Gilboa. Hila was involved in the B'nei-haMoshavim youth movement since she was 10 years old. She was a chanicha and a madricha in the Gan Ner ken and continued on to a Shnat Sheirut, year of community service, organizing community events as a madricha. Hila is fluent not only in Hebrew and English, but also in Arabic and Portuguese.

Daniel_NadavNadav, 23, is from Jerusalem, where he was a chanich and madrich, for at-risk youth, in the Tzophim (Israeli Scouts). Prior to his military service, he volunteered for a year of service and learning in the ha'Emek, a pre-army academy. Nadav also attended the Ein Prat Academy for Leadership where he studied the bible, Talmud, and Western philosophy.  

JDC Entwine Multi-Week Global Jewish Service Corps Opportunities

Entwine is an initiative of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), the world’s largest Jewish humanitarian assistance organization. I’m writing to let you know about an incredible opportunity for Jewish young adults to perform meaningful volunteer work this fall through the JDC Entwine Multi-Week Global Jewish Service Corps (JSC).

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Tisha B’av 5774

Tisha B’av, תשעה באב, the summer holy day commemorating Destruction and Renewal, challenges us as educators, Jews, and human beings every year. We hope these resources can aid you in your personal and communal observance of this day. Especially this summer, reflecting on this chag and current events, we are faced with its relevance. Conflict and injustice surround us. We must continue to learn, hope, and find ways to join as a Jewish people and as humankind to combat these recurring tragedies in search for peace and equality. Click here for the Tisha B’av 5774 Resources.

We wanted to send this out as early as possible for the resources to be useful to you all, especially those of you at machanot. We intend to send out some supplemental materials in the next two weeks before the chag.
Alu v’hagshemu,
The Mazkirut Artzit


Local Youth Group Joins in Campaign to Raise Minimum Wage

Jewish Exponent Square  APRIL 23, 2014
By: Ashira Naftali-Greer, JE Feature

A Center City protest last week to draw public attention to the campaign to raise the minimum wage had a decidedly young Jewish component, thanks to the efforts of the Philadelphia chapter of Habonim Dror, the Zionist youth movement that advocates for social change.   READ THE FULL STORY

 

Camp is time off for technology

cleaveland Jewish News Logo

 

KRISTEN MOTT CJN Staff Reporter
February 28, 2014 10:30 am

With cellphones, iPads and computers, children are constantly plugged in to technology. But when it comes time to attend an overnight summer camp, unplugging from technology is crucial.  “The whole idea is socialization and actually talking to people face-to-face and not texting or ignoring them, so we can build community,” said Shelley Goldwater, the executive director of Habonim Dror Camp Tavor, a Jewish overnight camp in southwest Michigan. “They’re so addicted to being on computers and such that they don’t even know what to do with themselves.”

Camp Tavor has always had a “no technology” policy in place for campers. Camp staff have access to computers to plan activities and are allowed to bring their personal cellphones to camp, but are not allowed to use their phones around the campers.  Read more ….

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CAMPS: Community Collective

San-Diego-Jewish-Journal

 

 

By Heidi Redlitz

A vibrant overnight summer camp for Jewish youth ages 8 to 17, Camp Gilboa fosters a lifelong commitment to collective responsibility, equality, and knowledge of Jewish history and culture. Located in the San Bernardino Mountains, it has since 1936 been the west coast branch for Habonim Dror, an international Labor Zionist youth movement.

Camp Gilboa has no shortage of typical camp fun, from kayaking and archery, drama and Israeli dancing, to nature hikes and team-building activities. Yet in its community-oriented approach to work and learning, “campers are participants and creators of their own space and experience,” says Dalit Shlapobersky, Camp Gilboa’s executive director.
To embody their social-minded ideals, Camp Gilboa encourages youth leadership so that campers become proactive camp counselors and adults. The camp is entirely self-maintained: Alumni and parents open and close camp each season, while campers, college-level counselors, and adult staff make it run through the summer. Since Shabbat is run by students, it becomes personally relevant to each camper.  READ MORE ….